News Stories in category: Zoology Terms and Anatomy

Natural History Illustration: Anatomy of an insect January 2015

Story posted: 15. January 2015 by Lizzie Harper

Insects are my favourite creatures, and I love illustrating them in my natural science commissions.  It always helps to fit form to function, so here's a brief overview of the parts of any insect which should help anyone about to do an entomological illustration.

Insects are invertebrates; they sport an external skeleton rather than bones on the inside.  Their limbs are jointed, they're cold-blooded, they have six legs and (mostly) two pairs of wings, and a body split into three sections; namely the head, thorax and abdomen.



Basically, any insect can be split into…

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Natural history illustration: Marvellous micro-organisms 3: Euglena October 31st 2014

Story posted: 31. October 2014 by Lizzie Harper

This final blog on micro-organisms, as seen by a natural history illustrator and someone busy with natural science illustration and science art, will focus on the Euglena.  Like the Ameoba and Paramecium , the euglena is a free-living unicellular organism.

It is found in fresh water (often in puddles or ponds) and differs from ameoba and paramecium in being able to photosynthesize, and so produce its own source of food.  The euglena appears green due to the chloroplasts in its cytoplasm , sites where photosynthesis occurs.  In reality, these can often appear clearer and…

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Natural history illustration: Marvellous micro-organisms 2: Paramecium October 24th 2014

Story posted: 24. October 2014 by Lizzie Harper

Natural history illustration involves painting plants, animals, and other wonders of the natural world.  Micro-organisms fall under this umbrella, and although extremely small they are still deserving of our attention (and illustrations).  Last week I looked at the Ameoba .  This week it's the turn of the Paramecium.

Like the ameoba, the Paramecium is an independent, free-living unicellular organism. Paramecium can be found in abundance in stagnant water where they feed off tiny bits of plant, and bacteria.  The largest are only 1/2mm long, so to examine them a microscope is…

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Natural history illustration: Marvellous micro-organisms 1: Amoeba October 17th 2014

Story posted: 17. October 2014 by Lizzie Harper

Scientific illustration can involve drawing all sorts of natural history speciemns, botanical, animal, and even microscopic.  In this series of three blogs I'll give a brief introduction to three common (and very cool) micro-organisms.  The first is the Amoeba.

Amoeba are free-living aquatic creatures, and can be seen in any drop of standing fresh water that you put under a compound microscope.  They also occur in salt-water, and as parasites within other animals (such as humans).  The largest is a little under 1mm in size. They are forever changing their shape by oozing…

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